The Right Way to Protect your VoIP Environment

A Session Border Controller (SBC) will allow you to connect your remote workers and SIP trunk(s) securely to your phone system without compromising security, automatically detecting VoIP threats and taking action. 

Additionally, Sangoma SBCs can automatically translate codecs and audio with built-in interoperability and transcoding capabilities.

What are SBCs? We're glad you asked!

Benefits of SBCs

Encryption

TLS and SRTP encryption ensures there is no way to “eavesdrop” on calls as they move between the IP phones and IP PBX.
Encryption

Business Continuity

Maintain essential services while transitioning between phone systems or SIP trunks or due to catastrophic scenarios.
Business Continuity

Interoperability

Ensure compatibility between VoIP carriers and endpoints.
Interoperability

Remote Connectivity

Securely connect remote users to the corporate phone system without requiring a VPN.
Remote Connectivity
SBC-SMB
SMB SBC
Small to Medium Business SBC
5-30 concurrent calls

Enterprise SBC

Medium to Large Business SBC
25-250 concurrent calls

Netborder SBC

Large Business SBC
250-4000 concurrent calls
Models

Virtual Machine SBC

Software Only Solution – Up to 1000 concurrent calls
Get a free two-call license to demo with our SBC software.

Applications

Remote Workers

Connect remote workers to the corporate phone system without opening up ports in the firewall. The SBC monitors all the traffic for any malicious registrations or threats and takes immediate action.

Cloud Phone Systems

In a hosted environment, enterprises rely on the service provider for all their phone system services. An SBC protects its networks while managing any interoperability issues.

SIP Trunking

Service providers can use an SBC to protect their network and introduce new revenue streams by providing SIP services to customers using legacy PSTN equipment.

Security

SBCs protect against malicious attacks such as Denial-of-Service, toll fraud, and SIP/RTP flooding while hiding network topology to keep network routes unexposed.